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Double Gate Lintel

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Double Gate Lintel
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Photo Comments

View looking north-northwest toward the top of the Double Gate. Note the two projecting features. The lower projecting arched lintel is Umayyad (A.D. 651–750). Above this arched lintel is a horizontal, decorated protrusion — on the level of the lower portion of the window in the upper right portion of this image — this too is probably Umayyad.

Look carefully between these two protrusions and visible are 4 trapezoidal stones, forming part of an arch. These are part of a relieving arch from the Herodian (New Testament) Period. Below the four trapezoidal stones, but above the lower Umayyad arch, is a portion of a large horizontal stone. This in fact is the lintel of the Herodian door.

This view is of a portion of the eastern most of the Double Gate, which was in existence in New Testament times. The western portion is not visible due to the perpendicular wall, which hides this portion of the gate. Inside, not visible are four domed chambers (probably Herodian) and two long narrow passage ways which rise to the current level of the Haram esh-Sharif, and which exit near the entrance to the el–Aqsa mosque (click here for a view of the upper exit of these passage ways).

 

View looking north-northwest toward the top of the Double Gate. Note the two projecting features. The lower projecting arched lintel is Umayyad (A.D. 651–750). Above this arched lintel is a horizontal, decorated protrusion — on the level of the lower portion of the window in the upper right portion of this image — this too is probably Umayyad.

Look carefully between these two protrusions and visible are 4 trapezoidal stones, forming part of an arch. These are part of a relieving arch from the Herodian (New Testament) Period. Below the four trapezoidal stones, but above the lower Umayyad arch, is a portion of a large horizontal stone. This in fact is the lintel of the Herodian door.

This view is of a portion of the eastern most of the Double Gate, which was in existence in New Testament times. The western portion is not visible due to the perpendicular wall, which hides this portion of the gate. Inside, not visible are four domed chambers (probably Herodian) and two long narrow passage ways which rise to the current level of the Haram esh-Sharif, and which exit near the entrance to the el–Aqsa mosque (click here for a view of the upper exit of these passage ways).